November 16, 2005

Garden progress

17 comments:

Gary said...

I am so jealous!

I forgot you guys in Florida get to keep playing in the dirt.

I just finished digging and storing the last of the over 100 dahlias. Big job. So glad they are dry and in the cellar.

Only thing left to get out are the beets and the brussels.

Gary said...

ps...fabulous redesign!

aikane said...

Gary, maybe your dahlias should winter in Florida! :-)

And, thanks for the redesign comment. It's trial-&-error for me, since I know nothing about web publishing.

Anonymous said...

So what goes in your garden to grow and survive during the brutal weather? Isn't that usually the time you guys end up giving up on most stuff?

- oddjob

(ps: I'll probably get my first frost tonight, which is unusually late; more typical would be the 3rd week of Oct.)

BlondeSense Liz said...

HEY! You get to plant new stuff this time of year? Damn. I am digging stuff up now. One of these days the frost will come.

Do the leaves ever fall off the deciduous trees there? I see one in the background

aikane said...

Our "brutal" weather would be a hard freeze. :-) Most of the garden is various kinds of greens (turnips and salad greens), broccoli, and onions, all plants that survive fairly well in frosty weather.

The decidious trees lose their leaves, but we haven't had any cold weather yet. Maybe by Thanksgiving. :-)

Gary said...

Speaking of that...In case I forget.

Happy Turkey Day!

We are leaving for New Orleans on Monday, no little ole storm is going to get in the way of our "family" tradition down there.

Dahlia's in florida! Flirt!

I will have to ask my 91 year old aunt if she minds the drive to plant them.

Have a happy.

Anonymous said...

No aikane, I meant the really brutal weather.

You know, when the only thing that will stand the heat, humidity, sun and bugs are sweet potatoes....

What grows in your veggie garden at the end of July and beginning of August?

- oddjob

aikane said...

Hmmm... the dog days of July and August? Not much except grass and weeds.

I grew up on a farm in northwest Florida, between Panama City and Dothan, AL, so gardening there is quite different from gardening in Central Florida -- soil, climate, and pests (like root nematodes). I'm still learning here. Basically, though, we have two growing seasons, Spring and Fall, but many vegetables overlap.

Here's the planting guide I'm using: "Florida Vegetable Gardening Guide, Table 4"

Anonymous said...

Yea, that's what I figured. Where I grew up outside of Philadelphia that was high summer and the best time of year for home grown produce.

Tomatoes in full swing.
Middle of blueberry season.
Raspberries on hiatus until end of August when the everbearers kick in again.
Everbearing strawberries still giving you fruit.
Peaches about to ripen.
Sweet corn every day if you wanted it.
Beans, summer squash, peppers just beginning to yield, even okra & peanuts soon if you were inclined to grow them.

Where I live now it's also high season, but you have to think about growing stuff that will ripen even though the summer's cooler. You end up having to grow tomatoes bred to ripen in a cold climate, etc., etc., etc.

(Good weather for all-summer salad greens, though! Where I grew up the lettuce would get bitter during July unless you were really careful about the varities you grew and how you grew them!)

- oddjob

Anonymous said...

(Actually mis-wrote that. Beans had been coming in for about a month at that point.)

aikane said...

Oddjob, where are you now? For some reason, I thought you were still in PA.

Anonymous said...

A little north of Boston. I moved to metro Boston ten years ago.

- oddjob

aikane said...

We have friends a little to your east, in Barre and Shrewsbury.

Anonymous said...

You mean my west? Barre & Shrewsbury, MA are both smallish towns west of Boston, and if you mean Barre and Shrewsbury, VT (more famous) they are even more so.

- oddjob

aikane said...

Yes, to your west, in Mass. I'm not dyslexic, really. :-) The guys in Barre own and run an inn and restaurant there, Jenkins Inn

Anonymous said...

They look to be far enough inland to be in the next hardiness zone, zone 5. I'm right on the water, so I get a big maritime effect on everything. All the temp. extremes are moderated, and in exchange it's always humid. However, since there's also usually a breeze, when the temp.'s high enough for the air to be uncomfortably warm & humid it often isn't, thanks to the breeze.

- oddjob